Title I - Part A

Title I-Part A, of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, provides additional funding for supplemental academic support to schools with a high percentage of poverty. The level of poverty is determined by the number of children in the schools receiving free or reduced‐price meals or direct certification data at schools with Community Eligibility Provision.

Need Help or Want to Give Feedback?

Title I Project Application Plan

The school district develops a plan each year that is submitted to the Florida Department of Education to describe the resources that will be provided with these funds. Examples of support that may be provided include intervention teachers, supplemental classroom materials and equipment, professional development for teachers, parental involvement activities, after-school tutoring and summer programs. Information about this plan is available through the school district’s Federal Programs and Grants Management office. Parental input regarding this plan is solicited each year.

Please contact the Federal Programs and Grants Management office if you would like to see the plan or make suggestions or comments.

Schoolwide/School Improvement Plan

Title I schools develop a Title I Schoolwide/School Improvement Plan each year and include information in the plan about how their Title I funds will be used to support the academic program in the school. The plans are developed with input from school staff, parents, and the School Advisory Council. School Improvement Plans are available at each school site and on each school’s website. Translation services are available upon request.

District Parent & Family Engagement Plan

Polk County has 99 Title I schools, with approximately 60,000 students being served through the Title I program. Our school district serves a very large and widespread geographical area. Because of our geographic size and diverse demographics, we are faced with the challenge of providing opportunities for many of our families because of location and barriers of transportation. Also, a large percentage of our students and families are being served through the Migrant and ELL program and language is a barrier.

According to the most recent Spring 2019 Parent Climate Survey, 4,202 parents participated in the survey. The 2019 Parent Survey collected parent perceptions regarding school service, environment & safety, resources, performance, and academics as feedback on the District’s general performance. Ratings were based on a scale of 1.00-5.00, with 5.00 being the highest rating: Service 4.05, Environmental & Safety 4.08, Resources 3.15, Performance 3.56, and Academics 4.05. Specifically, one of the highest ratings (4.11) was given for “I believe school staff care about students at this school” and a rating of 4.11 was given for “I believe I am welcome and respected at this school.” Due to COVID-19 and the unprecedented end to the 2019- 2020 school year, a district climate survey was not completed.

In addition to the District’s parent/school climate survey, parent involvement participation is also measured through attendance
and evaluations conducted at District events, and the Books Bridge Bus.

For any and all activities that build capacity, the LEA and schools outline in their Parent and Family Engagement Plan each activity, and how and what documentation will be kept: parent attendance, parent notifications/invitations, flyers and agendas, and opportunities to provide input through surveys and evaluations. This documentation provides both the LEA and schools feedback from parents to help plan activities that will meet their needs, as well as help identify and address barriers for poor attendance or participation.

The LEA has each school complete an “Annual Evaluation of the Activities to Build Capacity for Staff and for Parents”. This evaluation provides information from each school on their activities, evaluates the impact they have on student achievement, and documents the dates/times of each event, attendance, barriers (transportation meals/refreshments, childcare, translation), and parent comments/suggestions from each event. The evaluation also provides a breakdown of how their Parent and Family
Engagement allocation correlates with these events.

Overall, the parent surveys and evaluations of activities reveal a need for better communication between home and school, additional support to families not centrally located, and expanded efforts to involve parents in the education of their children. Based on these results and the monitoring of the school-based parent involvement plans, a wide array of programs and activities are planned to address the most effective way to nurture relationships with ALL families, and provide information, tools, resources, and materials to all parents so they can support their child(ren) at home to help in meeting their academic needs.

Mission Statement
To provide high quality education for all students

Engagement of Parents
– Each school uses their Parent and Family Engagement allocation to support parent and family engagement activities as outlined in their Parent and Family Engagement Plan. The LEA reviews and monitors how school Parent and Family Engagement funds are used in correlation to their school plan. The school Parent and Family Engagement funds may be used for some of the following; staff, costs associated with academic parent workshops, postage, presenters or registration for staff professional development related to working more effectively with parents, and materials needed for a parent resource center at their school’s site.

– The LEA allows the position of a Parent Involvement Paraprofessional to help implement school-based activities outlined in the school Parent and Family Engagement Plans. The LEA requires schools to implement a minimum of two activities/workshops for building capacity with the parents, which are outlined in the Parent and Family Engagement Plan and related to the goals in their SIP. Activities should be geared towards a core academic subject, transition/graduation, and/or college and career readiness, and meet the goal of improving student achievement. These two activities must be in addition to the Title I Annual Parent Meeting. Expenses for some of these activities may include materials, postage, consultants, child care, transportation, translation costs, stipends for teachers, and refreshments.

-The District Parent and Family Engagement Plan and the LEA plans are presented at the District Advisory Council (DAC) meeting and various parent events where all parents from the district are invited to get involved and provide feedback on the LEA plan via Google form, or handwritten feedback on the District PFEP. A hard copy is provided to all parents who attend the meeting. The LEA uses parent feedback to plan and/or revise the district level PFEP. Additionally, the District Parent and Family Engagement Plan (PFEP) is summarized into a document and available in English, Spanish, and Haitian Creole. The Home Language Survey results are used to determine the number of translations needed for distribution to all Title I school families. The summary of the District plan is distributed to all parents by mid-October, 2020. The complete District Title I Parent and Family Engagement Plan will be posted on the district website (www.polkschoolsfl.net), linked from each Title I school’s website, and copies will be in the Parent and Family Engagement notebook located in the Title I School offices by November 1, 2020. The LEA Plan is also discussed at each school’s Title I Annual Meeting. A PowerPoint template is provided to each Title I school to help present the plan to all parents. At the end of the Annual Meeting, parents complete an
evaluation of the meeting and provide input and suggestions.

– The LEA will approve schools to fund Parent/Family Workshops or trainings that bridge the home-school connection and/or ways to improve parents and schools working together. This may include any reasonable fees, registration, materials, professional development, and/or stipends that are allowable for involved staff. To help schools address barriers, it is allowable for schools to pay reasonable expenses for translators, childcare, and transportation for parent events. If a school would like to have a parent resource room on their campus; funds to support materials, resources and equipment needed for the resource room.

Technical Assistance
– The LEA’s goal is to educate, equip, and partner with our students and their support systems by offering a variety of relevant and effective programs, activities, and resources that will help make a positive impact on the individual and the community. By building strong parent/family-learning communities, we will increase student achievement in our schools. The LEA generates a goal through disaggregating data and feedback from District events, surveys, data, and parent input provided from the
schools.

– During the 2020-2021 school year, as outlined in our Parent and Family Engagement Plan the LEA will expand efforts to increase parent and family engagement by participating in professional development opportunities with Scholastic, allowing us to build the capacity of Title I contacts and transition from parent involvement to parent and family engagement.

-The LEA will provide technical assistance for completing the PFEP. Written guidance was distributed to all Title I schools in the spring of 2020 regarding the steps for completing the PFEP. In May of 2020, the LEA provided in-depth technical assistance to complete the PFEP and collect parent/family input. After schools submit the PFEP to the district, Title I Coordinators will review using a district-created checklist to determine all criteria has been met. The coordinators will provide feedback and schools will revise and submit the final draft of the PFEP.

– The LEA monitors documentation of all Parent and Family Engagement related activities to ensure fidelity in several ways: school support, an online documentation system, staff development and meetings, and onsite visits.

-An online documentation system, Title I Crate, is used to collect documents and monitor compliance. The LEA Title I School Coordinators have access to review all documentation at any time for monitoring purposes. Title I School Program Coordinators provide assistance to schools and monitor fidelity through constant communication, onsite school visits, and by attending the activities that are hosted at the schools.

– Another way the District monitors the implementation and fidelity of the school plans and Parent and Family Engagement activities is through data collection using cover sheets completed throughout the year. These cover sheets document the completion of the Compact, the PFEP (Parent and Family Engagement Plan), how parent input was obtained, and the dissemination of the Compact, Information on Parent’s Right to Know, and Curriculum and State Assessments to parents. In addition, the dates, times, and attendance for the Annual Title I Parent Meeting, and notification to parents of the availability of the PFEP, SIP, and Annual Report Card via EduData are monitored.

– In May, the LEA collects from each school their Annual Evaluation of School based capacity building activities with staff and for parents. The LEA requires schools to host a minimum of two activities/workshops with parents. These academic activities/workshops are outlined in the school plan and inform parents about transition/graduation, college/career readiness, and information on required state assessments and curriculum. The two required activities are in addition to the Title I Annual Parent meeting. The evaluation documents the type of activity, how the school addressed barriers, such as childcare,
transportation, translation, etc., how the parents were notified, the number in attendance, and feedback from evaluations of each activity. The LEA monitors school documentation through parent notifications and invitations, sign in sheets, agendas, and surveys and/or evaluations to gather parent input.

-The Parent Climate Survey is given in the Spring to allow parents and families to request support to better meet the needs of students in meaningful ways that will improve academic achievement. The District shares the Parent Climate Survey results with all Title I schools the following school year.

Coordination and Integration
The LEA will coordinate and integrate parent and family engagement strategies from Title I, Part A, with other federal programs (including but not limited to: Head Start, Early Reading First, Parents as Teachers, Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY), Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten, Title I, Part C and Part D, Title III, and Title IV, Part A) [Sections 1116 (a)(2)(D) and 1116(e)(4)] as follows:

WE3 (Perkins) – Polk County Public Schools will showcase its top educational workforce programs. The expo will feature nearly 400 booths spotlighting the innovative schools, programs, and careers available throughout the county, offering parents and students a convenient way to explore Polk’s many educational opportunities.

Poverty Simulation (Title IX) – The LEA bridges the gap from misconception to understanding poverty. The poverty simulation is an interactive immersion experience that sensitizes community participants to the reality of poverty.

Head Start/VPK/Title I PreK – The LEA coordinates with Title I Pre-K to provide classes for parents and topics include Getting Your Child Ready for School, Preparing for Kindergarten, and Reading with Your Child. Also, the LEA has a principal-onassignment that works with the Pre-K sites at Title I schools to ensure a successful transition from Pre-K to Kindergarten.

Migrant (Title I, Part C) – The Title I Books Bridge buses go to Migrant Parent Advisory Council Meetings (MPAC) to allow migrant parents and families the opportunity to visit the bus, take part in the various activities and receive a free book. Also, Migrant teachers and home school liaisons promoted activities and workshops at the Parent Involvement Resource Centers.

Title III – Provides classes for parents to attend to language acquisition.

Annual Evaluation
The LEA Parent and Family Engagement Plan and each school’s PFEP outline all parent and family engagement activities and events planned for that school year. The LEA and schools both evaluate the effectiveness of their activities through data collection which includes: attendance, sign in sheets, and activity evaluations. In addition, the District evaluates activities based on parent input from parent surveys, evaluations, and questionnaires.

The LEA monitors schools’ parental and family engagement and their effectiveness through site visits, data collection, and documentation. The LEA evaluates school activities, as outlined in their PFEP, through an annual evaluation of the activities. The evaluation, completed at the end of the year, includes data documentation of: attendance and sign in sheets, evaluations, District parent surveys, SAC and or PTA/PTO meetings, suggestion boxes, school website, and other school events and parent meetings. The information that is collected through this evaluation is what is used in the evaluation section of the PFEP.

The LEA also assures that parents are part of the planning process for writing and/or revising the school Compact and PFEP by having schools document how they offer opportunities for parent input specifically for these items and to provide evidence of that input. This information is uploaded with the PFEP template.

The LEA monitors the compliance of Title I Annual Parent meetings by having schools complete an “Annual Meeting Report” within the first six weeks of school. The report documents that schools have held their Title I Annual Parent Meeting and provides details on the process for notifying parents, the dates/times of meetings, attendance, and services provided to overcome barriers as outlined in their school PFEP. The LEA requires schools to provide opportunities and specific information to parents on how they can be involved in their child’s education through their school website, Parent/Family Informational Notebook, and as part of their PFEP. The LEA provides specific information that schools must make available to parents via their school website and in the notebook that is kept in the school’s front office. The LEA documents that each
school’s website and “Parent and Family Engagement Notebook” are updated for the current school year.

Building Capacity
1. Parent and Family Engagement School Contact Meetings

a. District Title I Coordinators
b. Provide training tips, information, and support services that strengthen the relationships between parents and the school in meaningful ways that improve academic achievement.
c. Fall 2020, Spring 2021
d. Evaluations/Agenda
e. Teacher to Parent Communication: Experimental Evidence from a Low-Cost Communication Policy (Draft, Matthew A.; Rogers, Todd – Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness, 2014) – This research study indicates that by building parent capacity through communication with teachers increase parent/child discussions and has a positive impact on student achievement.

2. School Funded Parent Resource Centers

a. District and Schools
b. Provides workshops and resources for parents that are linked to the Florida Standards to help increase student achievement.
c. Ongoing
d. Sign-In Sheets/Workshop Agendas/Calendar of Events/Inventory
e. Ohio Department of Education. (2016). Sample Best Practices for Parent Involvement in Schools. Retrieved from http://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Other-Resources/Family-and-Community-Engagement/Getting-ParentsInvolved/Sample-Best-Practices-for-Parent-Involvement-in-Sc. Research confirms that the involvement of parents and families in their children’s education is critical to students’ academic success.

3. Instructional Coaches

a. District and School-based Instructional Coaches
b. Analyze student data for planning effective Parent and Family Engagement activities in support of student achievement
c. Ongoing
d. Parent Sign-In Sheets/Evaluations/Agendas/Surveys
e. Mapp, K. L. 2012. “Family Engagement Capacity Building Framework (Draft).” Washington DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Innovation and Improvement. Downloadable PDF available at: http://www.ed.gov/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Family Engagement_ DRAFT_Framework.pdf.

4. Transition Nights – Kindergarten/Middle/High/College and Career

a. School Parent and Family Engagement Contact/Guidance/Administration/Student Success Coaches
b. Parents will become aware of college and career opportunities and financial aid procedures for their children and making a smooth transition from one grade band to the next.
c. Ongoing
d. Sign-In Sheets/Evaluations/Agendas/Surveys
e. College–We Want In!
Probst, Carolyn; O’Hara, Dennis P. – Journal for Leadership and Instruction, 2015
Engaging students and families early and often and using a continuum of strategies enable school leaders to close aspiration gaps, thus creating and sustaining a college-going culture for all students.

5. Parent Climate Survey Compilation of Results

a. District and Schools
b. Results are used to amend the SIP, Title I program, and the PFEP at school sites to better help meet the needs of parents and students in meaningful ways that will improve academic achievement.
c. Spring
d. Survey Results
e. Exploring the School Climate–Student Achievement Connection: Making Sense of Why the First Precedes the Second Jones, Albert; Shindler, John – Educational Leadership and Administration: Teaching and Program Development, 2016. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between student academic
achievement and various elements within the domain of school climate, and to examine the nature and potential causality of that relationship.

Staff Training
1. Back to School Principal’s Meeting

a. Director of Federal Programs, Title I Coordinators
b. Review ESSA, Title I statutes, and program guidelines of Title I, Part A
c. August 2020
d. SIP, PFEP, Evaluations
e. School Leadership Interventions Under the Every Student Succeeds Act: Evidence Review. Updated and Expanded. Research Report RR-1550-1-WF Herman, Rebecca; Gates, Susan M.; Arifkhanova, Aziza; Bega, Andriy; Chavez-Herrerias, Emilio R.; Han, Eugene; Harris, Mark; Tamargo, Jennifer; Wrabel, Stephani – RAND Corporation, 2016
This report describes the opportunities for supporting school leadership under ESSA, discusses the standards of evidence under ESSA, and synthesizes the research base with respect to those standards.

2. Title I Integration with other Federal Programs

a. Director of Federal Programs, Title I Coordinators
b. Ensures that schools are providing staff with information and professional development in all deficient areas.
c. Ongoing
d. Increased achievement in school grade and/or student standardized test scores
e. School Leadership Interventions Under the Every Student Succeeds Act: Evidence Review. Updated and Expanded. Research Report RR-1550-1-WF Herman, Rebecca; Gates, Susan M.; Arifkhanova, Aziza; Bega, Andriy; Chavez-Herrerias, Emilio R.; Han, Eugene;
Harris, Mark; Tamargo, Jennifer; Wrabel, Stephani – RAND Corporation, 2016
This report describes the opportunities for supporting school leadership under ESSA, discusses the standards of evidence under ESSA, and synthesizes the research base with respect to those standards.

3. Budget Meetings

a. Director of Federal Programs, Title I Coordinators
b. To assist principals with planning and implementation of effective parent and family engagement and professional development activities and ensure all expenditures are linked to improving academic achievement.
c. Spring 2020
d. Evaluations, School’s SIP plans
e. School Leadership Interventions Under the Every Student Succeeds Act: Evidence Review. Updated and Expanded. Research Report RR-1550-1-WF Herman, Rebecca; Gates, Susan M.; Arifkhanova, Aziza; Bega, Andriy; Chavez-Herrerias, Emilio R.; Han, Eugene;
Harris, Mark; Tamargo, Jennifer; Wrabel, Stephani – RAND Corporation, 2016
This report describes the opportunities for supporting school leadership under ESSA, discusses the standards of evidence under ESSA, and synthesizes the research base with respect to those standards.

4. School Parent and Family Engagement Meetings

a. Title I Coordinators
b. Provide technical assistance for parent involvement compliance documentation
c. August 2020 and January 2021
d. Agenda, Sign-In Sheets
e. Mapp, K. L. 2012. “Family Engagement Capacity Building Framework (Draft).” Washington DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Innovation and Improvement. Downloadable PDF available at: http://www.ed.gov/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/12/Family Engagement_ DRAFT_Framework.pdf

5. PFEP Guidance/Review Meetings

a. Title I Coordinators
b. Provide schools with feedback on planning effective capacity-building activities for parents and staff and provide technical assistance to review their PFEP
c. Ongoing
d. Sign-In sheets, PFEP Rubric Checklist
e. Mapp, K. L. 2012. “Family Engagement Capacity Building Framework (Draft).” Washington DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Innovation and Improvement. Downloadable PDF available at: http://www.ed.gov/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2012/12/Family Engagement_ DRAFT_Framework.pdf

Communication and Accessibility
The District Parent and Family Engagement Plan (PFEP) is summarized into a single sheet with information in a parent friendly language and is available in English, Spanish and Haitian-Creole. The Home Language Survey Results are used to determine the number of translations needed for distribution to all Title I school families. This summary of the District plan will be distributed to all Title I parents by November 1, 2020. The complete District Title I Parent and Family Engagement Plan will be posted on the District website (polkschoolsfl.com), linked from each Title I school’s website, and copies will be in the Parent and Family Engagement notebook located in school offices by November 1, 2020. The District flyer includes information for parents on Title I law, ways parents can be involved, information on coordination with other Federal programs, Title I Pre-K programs, Title I schools served (including private schools), school level parent resource centers, and information about how parents can have a voice in their child’s education.

1. Paying reasonable and necessary expenses associated with parental involvement activities, including transportation and child care costs, to enable parents to participate in school-related meetings and training sessions.

a. Refreshments, transportation, translation, and child care may be provided using school Title I funds
b. Principals and school-based Parent and Family Engagement contact
c. Schools distribute evaluations to parents and families to complete at the end of each event. Evidence of these evaluations are uploaded into the district’s online Title I Crate system and are reviewed by Title I Coordinators.
d. Ongoing
e. Identifying Barriers: Creating Solutions to Improve Family Engagement Baker, Timberly L.; Wise, Jillian; Kelley, Gwendolyn; Skiba, Russell J. School Community Journal, v26 n2 p161-184 2016
This study re-frames the notions of parent involvement (being present in the school building) to parent engagement (viewing multiple constructions of how parents are involved) while addressing parent solution addressing identified barriers such as flexible timing options, other children in the family (child care) and school events held in the evening (providing meals).

2. Maximizing parental involvement and participation in their children’s education by arranging school meetings at a variety of
times, or conducting in-home conferences between teachers or other educators, who work directly with participating children,
with parents who are unable to attend those conferences at school.

a. Flexible Meeting Times
b. Principal, Parent and Family Engagement Contact and school team
c. Schools distribute evaluations to parents and families to complete at the end of each event. Evidence of these evaluations are uploaded into the district’s online Title I Crate system and are reviewed by Title I Coordinators.
d. Ongoing
e. Identifying Barriers: Creating Solutions to Improve Family Engagement Baker, Timberly L.; Wise, Jillian; Kelley, Gwendolyn; Skiba, Russell J. School Community Journal, v26 n2 p161-184 2016

This study re-frames the notions of parent involvement (being present in the school building) to parent engagement (viewing multiple constructions of how parents are involved) while addressing parent solution addressing identified barriers such as flexible timing options, other children in the family (child care) and school events held in the evening (providing meals).

Evaluation of the Previous Year’s Parental Involvement Plan

Building Capacity Summary
Academic/Curriculum Workshops – parents and families learn about curriculum being taught in their children’s classrooms.

• Schools present these workshops in a variety of ways including workshops during the school day or before/after school. These workshops are often stand-alone, but some schools have consecutive workshops building activities and strategies from one workshop to another. The workshops last from 30 minutes to 2 hours depending on the school hosting the event.
• Mapp, K. L. 2012. “Family Engagement Capacity Building Framework (Draft).” Washington DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Innovation and Improvement. Downloadable PDF available at: http://www.ed.gov/blog/wpcontent/uploads/2012/12/Family_Engagement_DRAFT_Framework.pdf.
• Parents and families are given evaluations at the end of the workshop to complete. Completed evaluations are reviewed after each event to plan for more effective parent/family events in the future. Transition Workshops – parent and families learn about effective strategies to help their students transition from one grade level to another
• Schools present these workshops in a variety of ways including workshops during the school day or before/after school. These workshops are often stand-alone, but some schools have consecutive workshops building activities and strategies from one workshop to another. The workshops last from 30 minutes to 2 hours depending on the school hosting the event.
• College–We Want In! Probst, Carolyn; O’Hara, Dennis P. – Journal for Leadership and Instruction, 2015 Engaging students and families early and often and using a continuum of strategies enables school leaders to close aspiration gaps, thus creating and sustaining a college-going culture for all students.
• Parents and families are given evaluations at the end of the workshop to complete. Completed evaluations are reviewed after each event to plan for more effective parent/family events in the future. Assessment Workshops – parents and families learn about school, district, and state assessments that their children will be
taking throughout the school year. In addition, parents and families will learn about proficiency levels and strategies to help their students with assessments.
• Schools present these workshops in a variety of ways including workshops during the school day or before/after school. These workshops are often stand-alone, but some schools have consecutive workshops building activities and strategies from one workshop to another. The workshops last from 30 minutes to 2 hours depending on the school hosting the event.
• Mapp, K. L. 2012. “Family Engagement Capacity Building Framework (Draft).” Washington DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Innovation and Improvement. Downloadable PDF available at: http://www.ed.gov/blog/wpcontent/uploads/2012/12/Family_Engagement_DRAFT_Framework.pdf.
• Parents and families are given evaluations at the end of the workshop to complete. Completed evaluations are reviewed after each event to plan for more effective parent/family events in the future.

College and Career Readiness Workshops – parents and families learn about how to help their students prepare for college
and career after high school.

• Schools present these workshops in a variety of ways including workshops during the school day or before/after school. These workshops are often stand-alone, but some schools have consecutive workshops building activities and strategies from one workshop to another. The workshops last from 30 minutes to 2 hours depending on the school hosting the event.
• College–We Want In! Probst, Carolyn; O’Hara, Dennis P. – Journal for Leadership and Instruction, 2015 Engaging students and families early and often and using a continuum of strategies enables school leaders to close aspiration gaps, thus creating and sustaining a college-going culture for all students.
• Parents and families are given evaluations at the end of the workshop to complete. Completed evaluations are reviewed after each event to plan for more effective parent/family events in the future. Conferences –parents and families learn more about their students’ successes and areas of improvement through individual
conferences or academic parent team meetings
• Schools present these workshops in a variety of ways including workshops during the school day or before/after school. These workshops are often stand-alone, but some schools have consecutive workshops building activities and strategies from one workshop to another. The workshops last from 30 minutes to 2 hours depending on the school hosting the event.
• Teacher to Parent Communication: Experimental Evidence from a Low-Cost Communication Policy (Draft, Matthew A.; Rogers, Todd – Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness, 2014) – This research study indicates that by building parent capacity through communication with teachers increase parent/child discussions and has a positive impact on student achievement.
• Parents and families are given evaluations at the end of the workshop to complete. Completed evaluations are reviewed after each event to plan for more effective parent/family events in the future.

Staff Training Summary
Back to School Meeting – Principals and Title I Contacts are given updated information on the Title I law and what will be required for documenting compliance.

• Back to School Meeting was held in August 2019 – the LEA hosted two half day meetings to allow flexibility of when school contacts could participate. All handouts and materials were shared via email and uploaded in Title I Crate
• School Leadership Interventions Under the Every Student Succeeds Act: Evidence Review. Updated and Expanded. Research Report RR-1550-1-WF Herman, Rebecca; Gates, Susan M.; Arifkhanova, Aziza; Bega, Andriy; ChavezHerrerias, Emilio R.; Han, Eugene; Harris, Mark; Tamargo, Jennifer; Wrabel, Stephani – RAND Corporation, 2016
• School contacts and administrators were sent an electronic evaluation via email and asked to complete the evaluation. Data was collected via Microsoft Office Forms. The data was reviewed by district staff and was used to plan future meetings. Compact and Parent and Family Engagement Work Session – Title I Contacts were provided technical assistance for writing the Compact and Parent and Family Engagement Plan with emphasis on the requirements in ESSA.
• LEA hosted one face-to-face meeting, plus provided written guidance via email and webinar covering information covered in the work session.
• School Leadership Interventions Under the Every Student Succeeds Act: Evidence Review. Updated and Expanded. Research Report RR-1550-1-WF Herman, Rebecca; Gates, Susan M.; Arifkhanova, Aziza; Bega, Andriy; ChavezHerrerias, Emilio R.; Han, Eugene; Harris, Mark; Tamargo, Jennifer; Wrabel, Stephani – RAND Corporation, 2016
• School contacts and administrators were sent an electronic evaluation via email and asked to complete the evaluation. Data was collected via Microsoft Office Forms. The data was reviewed by district staff and was used to plan future meetings.

Private School Summary
A. Parents participated in a variety of parent workshops that included success strategies in reading and math, test taking tips, and preventing summer academic loss.
B. Private Schools hosted a variety of activities that were single night/day events that lasted between 30 minutes to 2 hours depending upon the school.
C. The LEA’s goal is to educate, equip, and partner with our private schools, their families, and their support systems by offering a variety of relevant and effective programs, activities, and resources that will help make a positive impact on the individual and the community. By building strong parent/family-learning communities, we will increase student achievement in our schools. Mapp, K. L. 2012. “Family Engagement Capacity Building Framework (Draft).” Washington DC: U.S. Department of Education,
Office of Innovation and Improvement. Downloadable PDF available at: http://www.ed.gov/blog/wpContent/uploads/2012/12/Family_Engagement_DRAFT_Framework.pdf.
D. Parents and families were given evaluations at the end of the activity to complete. Completed evaluations were reviewed after each event to plan for more effective parent/family events in the future. Also, parents/families were mailed surveys about the equitable services their students received and were provided a self-address stamped envelope to return to the Title I office. These surveys were used to plan for the 18-19 19-20 school year for instructional and PFE events. The LEA’s goal is to educate, equip, and partner with our private schools, their families, and their support systems by offering a variety of relevant and effective programs, activities, and resources that will help make a positive impact on the individual and the community. By building strong parent/family-learning communities, we will increase student achievement in our schools.

Barriers (LEA Plan Infusion):
Location of Parent Meetings (economically disadvantaged) – The LEA holds District Parent Meetings in different regional areas of our County. The LEA encourages schools to host parent events within their community to invite the community to participate. The LEA also encourages schools to partner with feeder schools to encourage parent attendance for students with siblings at that school.

Translation (limited English proficiency) – The LEA encourages schools to provide all materials to parents in other languages and works with the ESOL department to get materials printed for parents. Schools are encouraged to get translators for meetings.

Transportation (economically disadvantaged, disabled) – The LEA works with the school to provide transportation for parents. The LEA has partnered with the city bus systems and schools can take advantage of bus passes for student and families when applicable. The LEA also encourages schools to host events in the neighbors or community to help with transportation issues.

Best Practices
1. Effective Communication- Each Title I School has a school website and a Parent and Family Engagement Notebook located in their front office that contains the following information: District and School PFEP and summary, school parent compact, parent right to know letter, list of highly qualified staff, data and testing information, SIP, and other relevant information for parents.

2. Effective Communication- The LEA provides each school with an electronic version of the Title I Guidelines book. This guideline book is provided to schools online. The LEA designed the Guidelines book to be user-friendly with information on Title I Law, compliance, and how to document meeting compliance.

3. Building Capacity- The ESOL Department provides free workshops to parents who do not speak English. These workshops are held at each of the five regional parent resource centers.

Right to Know

All Title I schools are required to employ only highly qualified teachers and instructional paraprofessionals. You will be notified in writing if your child has been assigned or has been taught for more than four consecutive weeks by a teacher who has not met the “highly qualified” criteria.

In addition, you have the right to:

  • Know whether your child’s teacher(s) and/or paraprofessional(s) meet the state certification requirements for the grade levels and subject areas in which they provide instruction
  • Know whether a teacher and/or paraprofessional is teaching under emergency or other provisional status and state qualification or licensing criteria have been waived
  • Receive information on the qualifications of a teacher and/or paraprofessional, including the graduate certification or degree held by the teacher and/or paraprofessional, and the field of discipline of the certification or degree

If you would like to receive this information, please contact your child’s school.

Right to Know Letters

The purpose of this letter is to let you know that Polk County Public Schools will provide information to you regarding your child’s teacher and paraprofessional qualifications in a timely manner upon request.

Federal law allows you to obtain certain information about your child’s classroom teacher(s) and instructional assistants and paraprofessionals.

You have the right to request the following:

  • The teacher’s Florida certification area(s) and,
    • If the teacher is teaching infield or is qualified according to the District School Board of Polk County.
    • If the teacher has met state licensing criteria for the grade levels and subject areas in which the teacher provides instruction.
    • If the teacher is teaching under temporary, emergency or other provisional status OR has been teaching for less than four years.
    • If a teacher has received a summative performance evaluation rating of unsatisfactory per s. 1012.34, F.S., Personnel evaluation procedures and criteria.
  • The instructional qualifications of any instructional paraprofessional who provides services to your child.

You will be notified in writing if your child has been assigned or has been taught four consecutive weeks or more by a teacher who does not meet applicable State certification or licensure requirements at the grade level and subject area in which the teacher has been assigned [ESSA 1111(g)(1)(B, 1111(h)(5)(D), and 1112(e)(1)(B)(ii)]. The information regarding the qualifications of your child’s teacher and/or classroom paraprofessionals may be obtained from your child’s principal.

In addition, your child’s school will provide information on the level of achievement of your child on state academic assessments.  This information will be available at your child’s school.

Please be assured that Polk County Public Schools is dedicated to providing your child(ren) a quality education.  If you would like to receive any of this information, please contact your child’s school.

El propósito de esta carta es para dejarle saber que las Escuelas del Condado de Polk le proveerán información a usted en relación a las calificaciones del/de la maestro/a y para-profesional/es de su hijo/a de manera oportuna si se solicita.La ley federal le permite a usted obtener cierta información acerca del/de la maestro/a de su hijo/a, asistentes de instrucción y para-profesionales.

Usted tiene el derecho a solicitar lo siguiente:

  • Las áreas decertificaciónde la Floridadel/de la maestro/a y,
    • Si el/la maestro/aestá enseñandoen sucampo o materia o si está calificado/ade acuerdo con laJuntadel Distrito Escolar delCondado dePolk.
    • Si el/la maestro/a ha cumplido con los criterios de la licencia estatal para los grados y las asignaturas en las que el/la maestro/a provee instrucción.
    • Si el/la maestro/a está enseñando bajo un estatus temporero, de emergencia u otro estatus provisional O ha estado enseñando por menos de cuatro años.
    • Si un maestro ha recibido una calificación insatisfactoria en la evaluación total de rendimiento de acuerdo al estatuto s. 1012.34, F.S., Procedimientos y Criterios de Evaluación del Personal.
  • Las calificaciones educativas de cualquier para-profesional que esté prestando servicio a su hijo/a.

Usted solamente será notificado por escrito si su hijo/a ha sido asignado/a o ha sido enseñado/a por cuatro semanas consecutivas o más por un/a maestro/a que no cumple con los requisitos estatales aplicables de certificación o licenciatura a nivel de grado y área de la materia a la cual el/la maestro/a ha sido asignado/a [ESSA 1111 (g) (1) (B, 1111 (h) (5) (D) y 1112 (e) (1) (B) (ii)] SI no, se puede obtener información sobre las calificaciones del/de la maestro/a de su hijo/a y / o sus para-profesionales del salón de clases del/de la directora/a de la escuela de su hijo/a.

Además, la escuela de su hijo/a le proveerá información acerca del nivel de logro de su hijo/a en las evaluaciones académicas estatales. Esta información estará disponible en la escuela de su hijo/a.

Tenga por seguro que las escuelas del Condado de Polk están dedicadas a proveer a sus hijos una educación de calidad. Si usted desea recibir cualquiera de esta información, favor de comunicarse con la escuela de su hijo/a.

Objektif lèt sa a se pou fè w konnen lekòl nan Depatman Polk la yo ap ba w enfòmasyon konsènan kalifikasyon pwofesè ak asistan pwofesè pitit ou san pèdi tan lè gen demann ki fèt pou sa.Lalwa federal ba w dwa pou jwenn yon seri enfòmasyon konsènan pwofesè ak asistan pwofesè k’ap bay pitit ou pen lenstriksyon.Ou gen dwa pou w mande enfòmasyon sa yo:

  • Nan ki branch pwofesè a gen sètifika nan Florid e,
    • Si pwofesè a ap anseye nan branch lan oswa si l kalifye dapre kritè Direksyon Jeneral Lekòl nan Depatman Polk la.
    • Si pwofesè a satisfè kondisyon pou l gen lisans pou klas ak pou matyè pwofesè a ap anseye a.
    • Si pwofesè a ap anseye anba sitiyasyon pwoviswa pou gnon ti tan ijans oswa anba lot stati pwovisyonel oubyen ap anseye pou mwens ke 4 lane.
    • Si yon pwofesè ta recevwa yon pèfomans somativ evaluasyon ki pa satisfè dapre s. 1012.34, F.S., Pèsonel evaluasyon ak kritè .
  • Kalifikasyon nenpòt asistan pwofesè k’ap bay pitit ou sèvis.

 

Yo pral ekriw Selman e notifiyew si pitit ou wa te asiyen oswa si ke li te instrwi pandan 4 semèn konsekutiv, oplus pa yon pwofesè ki pa o nivo Sètifikasyon Leta mande a oubyen obligasyon lisansye a chak nivo ak klas matyè ke pwofesè a te asiyen an. [ESSA 1111(g)(1)(B, 1111(h)(5)(D), ak 1112(e)(1)(B)(ii)]. Si non, infòmasyon konsènan kalifikasyon de pwofesè pitit ou wa /oswa parapwofesyonel klas la, ou kap jwen infòmasyon sa yo nan biro direktè lekòl la l.

Anplis, lekòl pitit ou ap bay enfòmasyon sou nivo siksè pitit ou nan egzamen leta yo. Enfòmasyon sa a ap disponib nan lekòl pitit ou a.

Tanpri rasire w lekòl nan Depatman Polk la yo dedye yo nan bay pitit ou yon edikasyon kalite. Si w ta renmen resevwa nenpòt nan enfòmasyon sa yo, tanpri ekri lekòl pitit ou a pou w mande sa.

×

Elementary and Secondary Education Act

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), as reauthorized by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, provides benefits to private school students, teachers and parents, including those in religiously affiliated schools. Private school administrators are invited to an annual meeting to explore possible Federal Grants services in the areas of Title I (Education of the Disadvantaged), Title II (Professional Development services), Title III (ESOL), Title IV (21st Century), and Title X (Homelessness).

Under Title I, the district is required to provide to eligible private school children, their teachers, and their families Title I services or other benefits that are equitable to those provided to eligible public school children, their teachers, and their families.

Private schools that are 501(c)(3), nonprofit organizations may complete an Intent to Participate Form to take part in private school services offered by the district. Community outreach letters are distributed via certified mail to all private schools in Polk County in January of each year to participate the following school year.

EduData Portal

The department is pleased to announce the release of the 2018-19 School, District and State Report Cards in the EduData Portal. These report cards serve as a valuable resource for parents, educators and stakeholders by offering greater transparency into how Florida’s districts and schools are doing with regard to student achievement and success.

The 2018-19 Report Cards not only provide the 2018-19 performance data, but also contain several new features including a State Report Card; educator qualifications and equity; per-pupil expenditures; and national data. The department will continue to update information in the report cards as new data become available, as well as develop new enhancements based on user feedback received through the portal. News and updates about ongoing enhancements will be provided to those who subscribe through the portal.